Rashid featured on Zenko’s CFR blog

Earlier today, Micah Zenko posted a piece by our very own Salman Al-Rashid on his blog Politics, Power, and Preventive Action. Titled, “Saudi Counter-Terror Law Addresses Al-Qaeda Threat,” the article argues that genuine regional anxieties led to the drafting of a controversial law now circulating Saudi Arabia’s Shura Council. Amnesty International and others have criticized the draft law because it may ultimately criminalize dissent in the Kingdom. Rashid, however, offers a different perspective, and cites the deteriorating situation in Yemen–home to AQAP–as a major cause for the law’s consideration. Check out Sal’s article here. And here’s a taste:

This narrative [focusing on the domestic applications of an expansive CT law] assumes that the kingdom’s rulers are worried about domestic unrest. But the kingdom has remained relatively calm during chaotic times. Rather, regional developments give the Saudis genuine cause to fear potential terrorist attacks, and the final draft of the law likely will reflect this threat.

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1 Comment

Filed under Salman Al-Rashid

One response to “Rashid featured on Zenko’s CFR blog

  1. David Lin

    I agree with Sal’s assessment. This pending Saudi legislation sounds similar to the U.S. passing the Patriot Act in 2001 to help Gov’t agencies combat terrorism in the U.S. Many critics, including the ACLU felt that the Patriot Act would take away freedoms and certain protections under the First and Fourth Amendment and that the Act would be misused. To date, the Patriot Act has served its purpose in combating terrorism.

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